Monday, November 26, 2018

Why Does It Take So Long For The Model To Get Paid?


It shouldn't.

Typically it was normal to wait a couple months to be paid for a modeling job, however if the waiting went on over two or three months I contacted the agency and would kindly ask about an update on payment status for a certain job.

In my experience most of the time the print modeling agencies were professional when it came to payment, but that didn't mean surviving while waiting for modeling checks was easy. 

It meant I ate dollar menu meals, and fixed my scuffed up heels with a black marker sometimes before a go-see. Sometimes I would accept a hair modeling job and have my hair chopped or styled in any which way in-between paychecks in hopes one check would arrive sooner. Paying rent on time often felt impossible if it was slow.

For example, my email archives show a modeling job I did with a shoe catalog was booked for March 22 and it was paid by May 16th.

As infants, my children modeled as well, with a different print agency, and the checks took a couple months.

I consider 2-3 months normal and professional in my experience.

Recently, Federico Pignatelli, the founder of Industry Model Management, Pier 59 Studios, and co-writer of the Model’s Bill of Rights has been working with a model he represents, Simone Aptekman, and the duo drafted a comprehensive list of basic rights that models can and should expect from their agencies and clients.

The Rights proclaim that models should be paid no more than 60 days after completion of invoicing. 

I like that.

Please read Federico Pignatelli’s Model's Bill of Rights here.

As Aptekman said in a recent interview with iHeart Radio, 106.7 Lite FM WLTW-FM: “Whenever I was around other models, I would hear other girls talk about financial duress - their agencies would withhold payment for sometimes as long as 240 days – and other issues. In an effort to learn more, I hosted a symposium at my apartment with about 15 models to provide an open forum for us to air grievances and to provide support. An overwhelming theme was the financial and legal pressure that was placed on them by their agencies – specifically around timely payment for jobs, and threats about their visas which made the girls feel beholden to their agencies.”

Pignatelli echoes her sentiments: “The way that Models are treated is way too often simply disgraceful. In an industry that has grown exponentially over the past 30 years but entirely unregulated, I find myself now in the position, as the Owner of Pier59 Studios where the vast majority of Fashion Shoots occur, of demanding that the modeling industry cleans up its act. That is the goal of the Model’s Bill of Rights – to ensure the models are working in safe Studios and Location environments, are free from harassment, do not receive legal pressure from their agencies specifically surrounding their work visas, that Immigration Laws are respected in the interest of the Models and, fundamentally, that they are paid in a fair and timely manner, without unjustified overcharges. We want to educate these young Models so that they feel empowered and confident to be in charge of their career.”


Always be your best advocate. You are your business and brand, and now no matter your height there's the Model's Bill of Rights.







Dad's Rings podcast episode features my modeling pursuits

This narrative episode is about Dad's rings that I received at the funeral home after he died.







Listen on Soundcloud:



 #RRMDpodcast

#MyHeirloomStories

All episodes are here: https://www.isobellajade.com/running-rebel-mad-dog-podcast/


Healing Through Heirlooms Quotes




More quotes on healing through heirlooms and my own grieving process can be found at: www.8Heirlooms.com